Welcome to the Account Planning Maturity Assessment

Industry-leading companies invest in a combination of people, processes and technology to power successful key account initiatives for growth and deeper penetration. The account planning maturity model is an instrument to help an organization in assessing and determining the degree of maturity of its account planning processes, and how those are impacting the ability to become trusted advisors to their most strategic customers.

This self-evaluation assessment will score how you stack up against the rest of the industry, and offers actionable guidance on how to get to the next level. Take a few minutes to share details about your process today, and receive a detailed report including an account planning playbook with examples of how world-class strategic account teams have upped their game and the immediate gains realized.

Select the response that is most accurate to the current state within your organization surrounding account planning.

Take the Assessment ❯

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How do you currently segment your existing customer accounts?

  • We do not have a standardized way of assigning strategic accounts, and treat every existing account the same.
  • We consider accounts to be "strategic" if they account for a sizeable portion of our overall revenue.
  • We have basic criteria for ranking customers, based on things like size, past revenue, purchase history, tenure as a customer, etc.
  • We have a well-defined segmentation process to measure our accounts by factors like future growth potential, customer lifetime value, wallet share, strategic fit, market leadership, etc.
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Who in your organization is responsible for managing key/strategic accounts?

  • We do not have a specific group or individual responsible for this.
  • The individual sales rep that sold the initial product/service.
  • A dedicated account manager assigned to an account.
  • A cross-functional team to service accounts across customer success, sales, product, etc.
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Which of the following best reflects how your sales organization is structured around your largest key accounts?

  • We have only one sales rep calling per account.
  • Multiple reps from different business units call into the same account.
  • We have at most 2-3 reps calling into a single account, responsible for either net new or retention/renewal sales.
  • We have a strategic account manager responsible for coordinating between multiple sales reps who are responsible for different geographies, product lines, net new vs. renewal sales, etc.
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What best characterizes your process for account planning?

  • We don't have a defined process or specific requirements for account planning, or it is done in an ad hoc fashion at individual reps' discretion.
  • We have a standard process and templates, but we don't enforce consistency or adherence.
  • We have a defined, consistent process that all account teams are required to follow, with detailed documentation and some planning tools.
  • We have a high level of automation and structured process to build customized plans, capturing our defined company-wide process.
  • We have a dynamic process based on the level of customer we're engaging.
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What is the goal of your account planning?

  • It's a good mental exercise for the sales team
  • We perform account planning to identify the next opportunity to pursue.
  • The goal of our account planning exercise is to drive revenue predictability and higher profit margins.
  • To strategically engage with our best customers for long-term forecast visibility and to understand the potential for both risk and opportunity within given accounts
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How often is account planning performed?

  • We rarely have a true account planning session and each rep is responsible for growing their own accounts.
  • Account planning is typically an annual exercise, performed at the beginning or end of each year.
  • Account planning is typically done quarterly, to prepare for quarterly business reviews.
  • Account planning is an ongoing, living process done throughout the year and constantly revisited.
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Who participates in the account planning process?

  • The assigned sales and account managers own the account planning process with minimal to no participation from other departments.
  • The assigned sales and account managers own the account planning process, and a broader cross-functional team (which may include customer success, marketing, support, finance, operations, product, etc.) participates to some extent in the account planning process.
  • In addition to option 2, each department is responsible for developing and executing their portion of the plan (i.e. marketing is responsible for account-based marketing; customer success owns retention, etc.)
  • An assigned executive leader (C-level or line of business owners) actively participates and contributes to account planning.
  • Customers are involved in our account planning process to drive co-created plans and a trusted advisor relationship.
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What information is typically included in account plans?

  • We don't create formal, documented account plans.
  • We include basic elements like contacts, deals/opportunities and org charts.
  • We include some strategic elements like key relationships and influencers, and client strategy, business drivers and goals.
  • We include sophisticated elements like whitespace analysis, relationship/influence maps, scorecards, coaching reports and detailed action plans
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What level of technology do you use for account planning?

  • Individuals use a mix of either Word, PowerPoint or Excel, and documents are rarely shared or housed in a centralized area for broader access.
  • There's a shared drive or site and templates we're supposed to use, but there's minimal use of it.
  • We currently house account plans in a CRM system or internal database with some custom fields, but there is limited access to the data.
  • We have a centralized industry-standard software solution specifically designed for key account planning where all plans are categorized and stored, and the broader team has readily available access to the latest information.
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How do you measure key account success?

  • We do not have a standard way of evaluating key account performance – either because the data is scattered and it's difficult to get a complete picture of performance.
  • We use spreadsheets or manual reporting to calculate and estimate performance.
  • We do some manual analysis extrapolated from CRM or other in-house data.
  • We have full, real-time dashboards for measuring several key metrics, including indicators like: retention, wallet share, relationship, opportunity and risk factors.
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What is your current performance?

Your Results Are Ready

Thanks for taking the time to provide information about your current key account processes and performance. Please complete the form below to receive a customized report based on the data you entered. Regardless of how you stack up, we’ll share some ways that top-performing account teams have improved, and how their progress has translated to immediate strategic account growth.